Sales: (877) 345-5256Support: (800) 891-8880

shoppingcart $0.00 Checkout

Filter by:

The month of May is busy for most talent advisors across North America. We begin with high hopes of wrapping up talent reviews and filling our remaining open requisitions. We end the month by jockeying for face time with executives who have compressed calendars due to Memorial Day vacation plans.

Even if your schedule is a little crazy, you should begin thinking about your upcoming staffing challenges for the third quarter.

Talent is the single most important asset for any organization to achieve success. Of course, while the entire company may rely on HR for this crucial piece, most HR departments aren’t given limitless resources find and hire the best talent the workforce has to offer. High stakes and not a lot to work with – that’s a recipe for a real headache.

by Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer of CareerBuilder

In the best outlook since 2007, 65 percent of employers are planning on hiring recent grads, according to a recent CareerBuilder survey. That number is up from 57 percent last year, a sure indicator that the Class of 2015 has great career prospects.

The next generation of HR Leaders faces a challenge, not only in terms of managing five different cohorts, but a growing diversity of employees across the board.

I am a black woman. In recruiting.

Over the years, I’ve had opportunities to work on diversity teams. I have been invited to interview for roles in Diversity & Inclusion. I have been called upon to weigh in on issues of diversity. I have been the guest of honor at meetings that start and end with the assertion that more diverse candidates should be added to every slate.

Here is my typical response:

Workforce diversity is a touchy subject, and it can be all the more difficult to tackle with an ad hoc approach. With the increasing diversity of the population and the workforce, it’s more important than ever to have an effective diversity and inclusion strategy in place at your organization.

Jennifer McClure, president of Unbridled Talent, hosted a webinar this week to help HR managers understand their role in addressing workforce diversity and how to effectively implement a diversity and inclusion strategy.

Here are a few highlights from the webinar:

As an HR professional, you’re familiar with your organization’s strategies and goals. As a talent advisor, you understand the advantages of a diverse workforce. This puts you in a unique position to help your organization set and achieve diversity and inclusion goals that align with and advance existing business goals.

While the U.S. workforce may be gradually shifting toward office-based jobs, hundreds of non-desk occupations are still thriving, according to a new CareerBuilder/Economic Specialists Intl. study.

A variety of industries boast non-desk jobs that are experiencing growth, yet when it comes to the highest-paying occupations, health care is the clear leader. Ninety percent of the 20 highest-paying non-desk jobs are in health care, according to the analysis.

I believe that we are at an inflection point with organizational diversity and inclusion efforts.

What got us to this point is not likely enough to take us forward. It's time to hit the reset button on some of the mindsets and practices we apply to this work. Whether you are just getting started, trying to breathe new life into a stalled out effort or chasing greater impact, here are some potential “next practices” for your team, department or organization.

Pages

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31