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Each month CareerBuilder hosts a chat with HR and talent acquisition influencers to get to the heart of the issues everyone is talking about. Like politics or reality shows, generational diversity in the workplace is one of those topics that can elicit frank feelings and discussions among a community of people.

Unlike growing a chia plant at your workstation, you need to put a lot of time and effort into making your next hire. That’s because job seekers expect responsiveness and communication throughout the hiring process.

Building a strong talent pool of STEM workers is one of the biggest challenges in recruiting today, as more high-skilled workers are needed to step into complex, challenging roles based in science, technology, engineering and mathematics – and as employers complain they can’t find enough candidates with the needed skills to fill these roles.

Up until recently, employers had the upper hand in the hiring process. Now, that’s all changed.

On the heels of the Great Recession, employers were suddenly getting more applications than they knew what to do with, as millions of highly skilled workers found themselves out of jobs. Many companies took advantage of this and began devaluing candidates with lower-than-average salary offers for highly skilled jobs.

Business leaders and executives tend to be a rather focused group. It makes sense: After all, they’re tasked with creating and executing successful plans to achieve business growth and profitability. They want (and need) to win, and in order to have the best shot at a victory; they’re constantly seeking ways to gain competitive advantage. This is good news for talent advisors!

 

The final article of H&HN'S yearlong "Generations in the Workplace" series asks eight hospital leaders about a problem each found particularly challenging about managing a multigenerational staff, and the strategy used to solve it.

It’s no secret that STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) workers are some of the most sought-after candidates, making STEM positions some of the hardest to fill. Historically these roles have often been filled by men, in part due to the lack of women mentors in these fields and the stereotypes that exist about girls not being good at math and science.

How can we resolve the issue of global warming? What steps can we take to achieve world peace? And -- how can we successfully tackle the generational issues in today's workforce? These are all complex questions with multi-layered solutions.

Foreword by Dana Naquin, health care marketing manager, CareerBuilder:

Creativity: It's not a word that typically comes to mind when you think about workforce planning and talent acquisition in health care, but one that will start popping up more and more. As we prepare for a new year, HR will feel increased pressure — even more than usual — to do more with less, to get creative.

Are you setting up your workforce for success?

Millennials. Baby boomers. Gen X. The Silent Generation. (Coming soon: Generation Z.) Your workforce, whether you realize it or not, is a spectrum of generations – and with that comes variations in work styles, habits, motivations, values, strengths and more.

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